Richard Serra

 
O. I. C., 1999

O. I. C., 1999


Steel, massive, 2 blocks

80 x 96 x 112 cm each

weight: 7 tons each


The two steel blocks are installed facing each other on the centre axis of the chapel of the Sylvesterkapelle. With one block positioned upright on the narrow side and the other one lying on the wide side, the exact measures are not directly visible. This irritation leads to a constant tension. 

 
TOT, 1977

TOT, 1977


Solid Steel, 210 x 2010 x 30 cm
weight approx. 10 tons

This inclined slab ingot of rolled steel defines the space of the inner courtyard that was specially created for the sculpture. Partially sunk into the ground, the slab stands parallel to the window of the inner courtyard in full view of the open-plan exhibition area: no visitor can make his way through the exhibition without seeing Serra's TOT.

 
Circuit, 1972/89

Circuit, 1972/89

 

 

Massive rolled steel, 4 steel plates

354 x 796 x 3.2 cm each

 

The structure, in which the circuit is installed, was built especially for this artifice. A first version of the work in which the size of the steel plates were different, was realized at the Documenta 5, 1972 in Kassel. Another version, again of a different size is to be found in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

 
Circuit, 1972/89

"I am interested in sculptures which do not serve the principal of usability, sculptures without a function. Using is always abusing. They often accuse abstract art of not having socially significant messages. I have always thought that art does not need an external justification ... I am aware of the fact that there is no audience for sculptures ... But there is a huge audience for products which give the people what they want, and what they – as it is insinuated – need, and which do not offer more than what the audience can understand."

 

Richard Serra

 
Circuit, 1972/89

Born 1939 in San Francisco, USA.

Lives and works in New York, and Nova Scotia, Canada.